Current Issue

Stories & essays will be released on our website weekly starting the end of January.

Letter from the Editors
Aleksandra Hill, Rowan Morrison, Lian Xia Rose, Dev Agarwal

Special Content

Interview with Cynthia Zhang
Questions by Aleksandra Hill

Excerpt: After the Dragons
Out from Stelliform Press, 8/19

Fiction
Tomatoes
Eugenia Triantafyllou
 
Más chileno que…
Lily Raphaela Philpott
 
Non-Fiction
Art

Issue 1.4
Aya Ghanameh

 

Cover: Volume 1, Issue 4 by Aya Ghanameh

In the Artist’s Words

While working on the cover for this issue and it’s theme of ‘Food’, my thoughts always came back to my Palestinian grandmother, who cooked food native to our homeland for my family everyday of my upbringing in exile. Food is important to me because it’s one of the ways I grew up understanding Palestinian heritage and history, and is one of the only means Palestinians have to connect to and recognize our past. Our food goes back further than modern times, and we’re always thought about as a people entangled in a never-ending struggle, or not as a people at all. Food is something tangible— our food establishes legitimacy in our existence and in our truth. I wanted to create a scene of a grandmother and her grandchild preparing a traditional meal together while also connecting it directly to their heritage, which I captured with a symbol of an olive tree in the illustration with the aroma of the food turning into branches and connecting itself to the tree. The olive tree has long been a symbol of longevity and specifically resistance when it comes to the Palestinian struggle. The most challenging part of creating this piece was that it was difficult to visualize something personal in a more fantastical way, since the magazine is centered around speculative fiction. I knew I wanted it to be related to the olive tree as that is directly related to the Palestinian struggle, but I also wanted the scene to capture a moment that is universal between a grandparent and a grandchild. I hope the warmth of this moment comes through to the readers.

-Aya Ghanameh

Aya Ghanameh is a Palestinian illustrator, writer, and designer. In her work, she is particularly invested in inclusivity and intersectionality, and exploring how literary and visual arts can expand the horizons of knowledge production related to cultural identity beyond nationalist ways of thinking to center the voices of ordinary people. She is a recent graduate of the Illustration department at the Rhode Island School of Design, where she earned her BFA with a minor in Literary Arts and Studies. Her debut children's picture book, These Olive Trees, is due for publication in spring 2023 with Viking Children’s Books at Penguin Random House.
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